Click On The Icons To See Our Pages

Get Updates Straight To Your EMail!


LENS PORN: Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)
Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)



The Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 being featured here is the later 1965/6 version. Starting from 1958, when Minolta finally created their own SRT SLR and first ever set of lenses, this 35mm being one of them. The specs varies from version to version and one might get confused in pinpointing which version they own. The copy I have has a different optical formula, a filter thread size of 55mm and the aperture goes down to f/16 (1965/6 version).

Now let's talk flange distance and adapting to modern cameras... you can easily find 'Minolta MD to xxx Adapters' nowadays (xxx being your camera brand). Minolta MD or SRT has a flange distance of 43.50mm, that means you need an adapter WITH GLASS for Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Olympus digital SLR's. However, this is best adapted for mirrorless and micro 4/3 cameras.


========================================

SPECS


Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8

Year Introduced: 1958

Version of this copy: 1965/1966

Formula: 6 groups, 7 elements

Minimum Focusing Distance: 0.4 meters / 1.25 feet

Focus Throw: 180 degrees

Aperture Run: f/2.8 - f/16 (Full Stop Clicks)

Aperture Blades: 8

Made in Japan

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

========================================

SUMMARY


FOR

This sells very cheap nowadays.

Full stop clicks on the aperture ring. I always turn my aperture by full stops so this is an advantage. Why? Because it's easier to count how many stops I go up/down.

The lens has a depth of field preview switch typical of the Minolta SRT/MD lenses.

Supports automatic diaphragm opening, useful for composing while looking in the viewfinder. The context here is that lenses in this era still have manual or preset aperture. (Please Google for more info.)

MFD is 0.4 meters, typical of lenses in this focal length.

This is a solid all-metal built lens. My copy obviously shows signs of torture and abuse, but it's still working!



NEUTRAL

At f/2.8, images are pearly and soft. I'm putting it here because some like me may like the 'vintage' effect, while others don't. It get sharp from f/4 all the way down to f/16

Well, I can't complain if I can only use it as a macro lens on my Nikon D5200. I have ordered a Minolta MD to Nikon Adapter (with glass), but the lens was already sold.



AGAINST

The focus ring of my copy is stiff

Looking at the glass, looks like it's only single coated. Many lenses in the same era have colored reflections, while this one shows nearly translucent/colorless. Looks like the coating is not very effective.

I often find that Minolta lenses have 55mm filter threads. Shopping around for filters can be hard because the sizes that shops offer are usually 52mm, then 58mm. 55mm filter size is hard to find locally... yes, you have to shop abroad for this particular size.

The lens has a cool bluish color shift. If you change lenses alot, the implication is that you need to customize and change your white balance often.



CONCLUSION

There is not much to conclude since I only used this lens freelensing on my Nikon D5200 and I only shot macros with it.

Despite my complaints, I was blown away by the beautiful pearly and dreamy atmosphere it creates at f/2.8 -- as if it has a built-in soft filter. Most people will be turned off by this, but you just can never recreate this impression in post processing.

If you're using this lens outdoor or want sharpness, you should stop it down to f/4. I think there are many stupid people using old lenses like this at their widest aperture when they are outdoor or in bright light, and then complaining about all sorts of defects like softness in the corner and aberrations, lack of contrast, poor resolution, etc. The problem is that people don't care to know the limitations of their tool and use their heads to work around it, they don't know how to use it properly, then they blame their lack of skills and understanding on the tool.

My recommendation is that you only use this lens in f/2.8 if you want to produce a dreamy effect. If you want sharpness, the only way to go is f/4 or f/8.


========================================

SAMPLES


To be fair to the lens, I just want you to know that the copy I have had scratches on the front glass and the lens looks really 'demolished'. Also, I only have my Nikon D5200 to freelens and test, so you will only see macro or closeup samples here.


Nikon D5200 Settings

Photo Size - Basic/Small
White Balance - Preset
Picture Profile - SD (Standard)
HDR/ADL/Flash - Off

All photos are unedited and using freelensing.

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)

Minolta W.Rokkor HG 35mm f/2.8 (1965/6 Version)
This was at f/2.8

========================================

Further Reading


My Photo Album

Video Demo:





0 comments :

Post a Comment

 

About me

The Nikon D5200 as my weapon of choice.

Vintage lenses are my poison.

Kindly hit on the blue CONTACT button at the lower right corner of this page to get in touch for collaboration.


Google+ Followers

FB Feed

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *